Sailing Weather Forecasts

PassageWeather.com specialises in Sailing Weather Forecasts, and was developed out of the need for reliable, easy to use weather information... We provide 7-day Wind, Wave and Weather Forecasts to help sailors with their passage planning and weather routing.

Both before and during deliveries, ocean races, regattas, cruises and all other types of offshore passages, we have your whole route covered.

Our Weather Data






The weather data that we use to produce our weather forecast charts come from the most trusted and reliable sources available. These sources include the US National Weather Service (NWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP), the Marine Meteorology Division of the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), Frivind AS and the Cyprus Oceanography Center.

Our worldwide Surface Wind (10m above sea level), Surface Pressure, Visibility, Cloud Cover and Precipitation forecast charts are derived from the 0.5 degree GFS (Global Forecast System) model, one of the operational forecast models run at NCEP. The GFS model is run four times daily, with forecast output to 180 hours (7.5 days).

For North America, we create higher-resolution Surface Wind (10m above sea level) charts using data from the 12 km (~0.12 degree) NAM (North American Mesoscale) model. This model, an NCEP implementation of the WRF-NMM model, is run 4 times a day, with forecast output to 84 hours (3.5 days).

We run higher-resolution Surface Wind (10m above sea level) charts for parts of Western Europe and the Mediterranean Sea, using data from the 18 km (~0.2 degree) COAMPS (Coupled Ocean / Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System) model. Developed by the NRL. This model is run twice a day, with forecast output to 96 hours (4 days).

We also run high-resolution Surface Wind (10m above sea level) charts for Western Europe and the Mediterranean Sea using data from the WRF model. This advanced weather model is run by Frivind AS, a company specialized in maritime forecasting and data modelling. The WRF is a high-resolution model run on a 0.075 degree (~9km) grid. This model is run four times a day, alternating between North Europe and Central Europe, with forecast output to 72 hours (3 days).

Our Wave Height & Direction forecast charts are derived from the WW3 (WaveWatch III) model, the third generation of the wave model developed at NOAA/NCEP. The WW3 model is also run four times daily, with forecast output to 180 hours (7.5 days).

Note: The Great Lakes WW3 wave model only provides forecast output to 84 hours (3.5 days)

The Wave Height & Direction forecast charts for the Mediterranean Sea, Black Sea and Baltic Sea are derived from the WW3 wave model, Developed and run by the NRL. This model is run twice a day, with forecast output to 96 hours (4 days).

The Gulf Stream Velocity and Direction charts (as well as these regions' Sea Surface Temperature charts) use data from the Real-Time Ocean Forecast System (RTOFS), developed by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The RTOFS model is run once a day, with forecast output to 144 hours (6 days).

We create the Sea Surface Temperature analysis charts using AVHRR + AMSR data from NASA's Earth Observing Satellite System, as well as ship and buoy SST observations. This data is produced daily, with output analysis valid the previous day.

Disclaimer

The user assumes the entire risk related to its use of this data. PassageWeather.com is providing this data "as is", and PassageWeather.com disclaims any and all warranties, whether express or implied, including (without limitation) any implied warranties of merchantability or fitness for a particular purpose. In no event will PassageWeather.com be liable to you or to any third party for any direct, indirect, incidental, consequential, special or exemplary damages or lost profit resulting from any use or misuse of this data.

These forecasts are produced from computer models and may not always reflect official forecasts, especially in the vicinity of weather fronts, tropical cyclones (tropical depressions, tropical storms, hurricanes, typhoons, etc.) or in rapidly changing conditions. As they contain no input from weather forecasters, it is important to check the official marine forecasts and warnings for your area when strong winds or tropical cyclones are forecast.

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